Sutta Pitaka
Saṃyutta Nikāya
Division III - Khandhaka
Book 21 - Khandha Saṃyutta
Section 2 - The Middle Fifty
Chapter 3 - Khajjanīya (
Tatiyo) Vagga

Namo tassa bhagavato arahato sammā sambuddhassa

 

21. 2. 3. 1.

(73) Assādo -

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta's grove in Sāvatthi.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. “Monks, the not learned ordinary man does not know the satisfaction, danger, and escape from matter as it really is.

4. “The not learned ordinary man does not know the satisfaction, danger, and escape from feelings as they really are.

5. “The not learned ordinary man does not know the satisfaction, danger, and escape from perceptions as they really are.

6. “The not learned ordinary man does not know the satisfaction, danger, and escape from inentions as they really are.

7. “The not learned ordinary man does not know the satisfaction, danger, and escape from consciousness as it really is.

8. “Monks, the learned noble disciple knows the satisfaction, danger, and escape from matter as it really is.

9. “The learned noble disciple knows the satisfaction, danger, and escape from feelings as they really are.

10. “The learned noble disciple knows the satisfaction, danger, and escape from perceptions as they really are.

11. “The learned noble disciple knows the satisfaction, danger, and escape from inentions as they really are.

12. “The learned noble disciple knows the satisfaction, danger, and escape from consciousness as it really is.

 

21. 2. 3. 2.

(74) Samudayo I - Arising I

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta's grove in Sāvatthi.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. “Monks, the not learned ordinary man does not know the arising, fading, satisfaction, danger, and escape from matter as it really is.

4. “The not learned ordinary man does not know the arising, fading, satisfaction, danger, and escape from feelings as they really are.

5. “The not learned ordinary man does not know the arising, fading, satisfaction, danger, and escape from perceptions as they really are.

6. “The not learned ordinary man does not know the arising, fading, satisfaction, danger, and escape from inentions as they really are.

7. “The not learned ordinary man does not know the arising, fading, satisfaction, danger, and escape from consciousness as it really is.

8. “Monks, the learned noble disciple knows the arising, fading, satisfaction, danger, and escape from matter as it really is.

9. “The learned noble disciple knows the arising, fading, satisfaction, danger, and escape from feelings as they really are.

10. “The learned noble disciple knows the arising, fading, satisfaction, danger, and escape from perceptions as they really are.

11. “The learned noble disciple knows the arising, fading, satisfaction, danger, and escape from inentions as they really are.

12. “The learned noble disciple knows the arising, fading, satisfaction, danger, and escape from consciousness as it really is.

 

21. 2. 3. 3.

(75) Samudayo II - Arising II

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta's grove in Sāvatthi.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. “Monks, the learned noble disciple knows the arising, fading, satisfaction, danger, and escape from matter as it really is.

4. “The learned noble disciple knows the arising, fading, satisfaction, danger, and escape from feelings as they really are.

5. “The learned noble disciple knows the arising, fading, satisfaction, danger, and escape from perceptions as they really are.

6. “The learned noble disciple knows the arising, fading, satisfaction, danger, and escape from inentions as they really are.

7. “The learned noble disciple knows the arising, fading, satisfaction, danger, and escape from consciousness as it really is.

 

21. 2. 3. 4.

(76) Arahanta I - Worthy Ones I

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta's grove in Sāvatthi.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. “Monks, matter is impermanent. That which is impermanent is unpleasant. In unpleasantness there is no self. That which is no self is not mine, I am not there, and it is not my self. This should be seen as it really is with right wisdom.

4. “Monks, feelings are impermanent. That which is impermanent is unpleasant. In unpleasantness there is no self. That which is no self is not mine, I am not there and they are not my self. This should be seen as it really is with right wisdom.

5. “Monks, perceptions are impermanent. That which is impermanent is unpleasant. In unpleasantness there is no self. That which is no self is not mine, I am not there and they are not my self. This should be seen as it really is with right wisdom.

6. “Monks, intentions are impermanent. That which is impermanent is unpleasant. In unpleasantness there is no self. That which is no self is not mine, I am not there and they are not my self. This should be seen as it really is with right wisdom.

7. “Monks, consciousness is impermanent. That which is impermanent is unpleasant. In unpleasantness there is no self. That which is no self is not mine, I am not there, and it is not my self. This should be seen as it really is with right wisdom.

8. “Monks, the learned noble disciple seeing it thus turns from matter, feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness.

9. “Turning he looses interest and loosing interest is released. When released knowledge arises I am released and he knows, birth is destroyed, the holy life is lived to the end, duties are done there is nothing more to wish.

10. “Monks, of all stations of consciousness as high as the topmost, the consciousness of worthy ones is superior. It is the most superior in the world.”

11. The Blessed One said thus and the Teacher further said:

1. “The worthy are indeed mentally healthy,
Craving is not evident in them.
Cutting up the measuring `I be'
They have split the net of delusion.

2. Attained to the unmoved state,
Their minds are not disturbed.
They are not soiled in the world,
Without desires, they become Brahma.

3. Thoroughly knowing the five masses,
And feeding on the seven good Teachings
Praised by Great Beings, they are
The legitimate sons of the Enlightened One,

4. Endowed with the seven jewels,
And trained in the threefold measuring
The heroes go here and there.
Their great fear is dispelled,

5.The concentrated Great Beings,
Endowed with, ten qualities.
Are the highest in the world.
They do not crave anything.6p6. Born in the knowledge of Worthy Ones,
And bearing their last bodies
Realized the essence of the holy life,
After that, they do not depend on another.6p7. Not musing the threefold measuring,
They are released from rebirth.
These well trained ones,
Are the winners in the world.6p8. They are not interested in anything,
That's above, across, or in the past.
They roar the lion's roar,
Saying enlightenment is incomparable.”

 

21. 2. 3. 5.

(77) Arahanta II - Worthy Ones II

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta's grove in Sāvatthi.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. “Monks, matter is impermanent. That which is impermanent is unpleasant. In unpleasantness there is no self. That which is no self is not mine, I am not there, and it is not my self. This should be seen as it really is with right wisdom.

4. “Monks, feelings are impermanent. That which is impermanent is unpleasant. In unpleasantness there is no self. That which is no self is not mine, I am not there and they are not my self. This should be seen as it really is with right wisdom.

5. “Monks, perceptions are impermanent. That which is impermanent is unpleasant. In unpleasantness there is no self. That which is no self is not mine, I am not there and they are not my self. This should be seen as it really is with right wisdom.

6. “Monks, intentions are impermanent. That which is impermanent is unpleasant. In unpleasantness there is no self. That which is no self is not mine, I am not there and they are not my self. This should be seen as it really is with right wisdom.

7. “Monks, consciousness is impermanent. That which is impermanent is unpleasant. In unpleasantness there is no self. That which is no self is not mine, I am not there, and it is not my self. This should be seen as it really is, with right wisdom.

8. “Monks, the learned noble disciple seeing it thus turns from matter, feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness.

9. “Turning looses interest and loosing interest is released. When released knowledge arises I am released and he knows, birth is destroyed, the holy life is lived to the end, duties done, I have nothing more to wish.

10. “Monks, of all stations of consciousness as high as the topmost, the consciousness of the worthy ones is superior, it is the most superior in the world.”

 

21. 2. 3. 6.

(78) Sīha - The Lion

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta's grove in Sāvatthi.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. “Monks, the lion, king of animals, comes out of his den, stretches himself, looks in the four directions, roars the lion's roar three times, and sets out in search of prey.

4. “Monks, the wild animals that hear the lion's roar become frightened and anxious about their selves and those, living in holes enter holes, living in water dive into water, living in the forest enter the forest, and birds fly away.

5. “The king's elephants in the villages and hamlets well bound with strong ropes, break the bonds, tear them and, frightened, strew urine and excreta and run away wherever their heads turn.

6, “Monks this much is the excellence and the supremacy of the lion to the wild animals.

7. “In the same manner, monks when the Thus Gone One, worthy, rightfully enlightened, endowed with knowledge and conduct, well gone, the knower of the worlds, the tamer of those to be tamed, the Teacher of gods and men, enlightened, and blessed is born in the world and teaches, `This is matter, this the arising of matter, the fading of matter. These are feelings, perceptions, intentions and this is consciousness, the arising of consciousness and the fading of consciousness.'

8. “Monks, those gods with long life, beauty, enjoying much pleasantness, and established long in heavenly palaces hear the teachings of the Thus Gone One and become frightened, and anxious about their selves. `Friends, we being impermanent thought we were permanent; we, being evanescent thought we were everlasting. Indeed, we are impermanent, not everlasting completed with a self view

9. “Monks, this is the excellence and the supremacy of the Thus Gone One to the world together with its gods and men.”

10. The Blessed One said thus and the Teacher further said:

1. “When enlightenment was realized,
The wheel of the Teaching was set rolling,
To the world with its gods and men,
The Teacher was incomparable.

2. He taught the cessation of self view,
The arising of self view
And the Noble Eightfold Path,
For overcome all unpleasantness.

3. Even the gods enjoying long life
Beauty and fame, became frightened
And anxious like the wild animals
Overcome by the lion.

4. Without overcoming the self view,
Friends, we are indeed impermanent.
We know this, hearing the words of
The released worthy ones.”

 

21. 2. 3. 7.

(79) Khajjanīya - Oppression

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta's grove in Sāvatthi.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. “Monks, all recluses and brahmins that recall their previous births, recall it through recalling one or the other of the five holding masses. What five?

4. “In the past I was of this matter.' Thus he recalls it through recalling only matter. `In the past I was of these feelings.' Thus he recalls it through recalling only feelings. `In the past I was of these perceptions.' Thus he recalls it through recalling only perceptions. `In the past I was of these intentions.' Thus he recalls it through recalling only intentions. `In the past I was of this consciousness.' Thus he recalls it through recalling only consciousness.

5. “Monks, why is it called matter? One is oppressed, therefore it is called matter. How is the oppression? Is oppressed by cold, heat, hunger, thirst, by the sting of gadflies and yellow flies, by the heat of the air and the touch of creeping things. Monks because it matters, it is called matter.

6. “Monks, to what are called feelings? Is felt, therefore they are called feelings. What is felt? Pleasantness is felt, unpleasantness is felt and neither unpleasantness nor pleasantness is felt. Monks, is felt, therefore they are called feelings.

7. “Monks, to what are called perceptions? Is perceived, therefore they are called perceptions. What is perceived? Blue is perceived, yellow is perceived, red is perceived and white is perceived.

Monks, is perceived, therefore they are called perceptions.

8. “Monks, to what are called intentions? Prepares to perform, therefore are called intentions. What is prepared to perform? Matter is prepared to perform as matter Feelings are prepared to perform as feelings. Perceptions are prepared to perform as perceptions. Intentions are prepared to perform as intentions. And consciousness is prepared to perform as consciousness.

9. “Monks, to what is called consciousness? Is known, therefore is called consciousness. What is known? The sour is known, the bitter is known. Roughness and softness are known. Hardness and non hardness are known. Taste of salt is known. Therefore it is said consciousness.

10. “Monks, the learned noble disciple reflects thus:

11. `At present I am oppressed by matter. In this same manner I was oppressed by matter in the past. If I enjoy matter in the future, then too I will be oppressed, in this same manner.' Reflecting in this manner he does not desire past matter, is not interested in future matter, and falls to the method of turning, loosing interest, and ceasing from present matter.

12. `At present I am oppressed by feelings. In this same manner I was oppressed by feelings in the past. If I enjoy feelings in the future, then too I will be oppressed, in this same manner.' Reflecting in this manner he does not desire past feelings, is not interested in future feelings and falls to the method of turning, loosing interest, and ceasing from present feelings.

13. “`At present I am oppressed by perceptions. In this same manner I was oppressed by perceptions in the past. If I enjoy perceptions in the future, then too I will be oppressed, in this same manner.' Reflecting in this manner he does not desire past perceptions, is not interested in future perceptions and falls to the method of turning, loosing interest, and ceasing from present perceptions.

14. “`At present I am oppressed by intentions. In this same manner I was oppressed by intentions in the past. If I enjoy intentions in the future, then too I will be oppressed, in this same manner.' Reflecting in this manner he does not desire past intentions, is not interested in future intentions and falls to the method of turning, loosing interest, and ceasing from present intentions.

15. “`At present I am oppressed by consciousness. In this same manner I was oppressed by consciousness in the past. If I enjoy consciousness in the future, then too I will be oppressed, in this same manner.' Reflecting in this manner he does not desire past consciousness, is not interested in future consciousness and falls to the method of turning, loosing interest, and ceasing from present consciousness

16. “Monks, is matter permanent or impermanent?”

“Venerable sir, it is impermanent.”

“That which is impermanent, is it unpleasant or pleasant?”

“Venerable sir, it is unpleasant.”

“That which is impermanent, unpleasant changing, is it suitable to be reflected,`It is mine, I am there, it is my self'?”

“That is not so, venerable sir.”

17. “Monks, are feelings permanent or impermanent?”

“Venerable sir, they are impermanent.”

“Those that are impermanent, are they unpleasant or pleasant?”

“Venerable sir, they are unpleasant.”

“Those that are impermanent, unpleasant changing are they suitable to be reflected, they are mine, I am there, it is my self?”

“That is not so, venerable sir.”

18.-19. Monks are perceptions, intentions, permanent or impermanent?”

“Venerable sir, they are impermanent.”

“Those that are impermanent, are they unpleasant or pleasant?”

“Venerable sir, they are unpleasant.”

“Those that are impermanent, unpleasant and changing are they suitable to be reflected, they are mine, I am there, they are my self?”

“That is not so, venerable sir.”

20. “Monks, is consciousness permanent or impermanent?”

“Venerable sir, it is impermanent.”

“That which is impermanent, is it unpleasant or pleasant?”

“Venerable sir, it is unpleasant.”

“That which is impermanent, unpleasant, changing, is it suitable to be reflected,`It is mine, I am there, it is my self'?”

“That is not so, venerable sir.”

21. “Therefore, monks, whatever matter in the past, future or at present, internal or external rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or near, is not mine, I am not there it is not my self.

22-23. “Monks, whatever feelings, whatever perceptions in the past, future or at present, internal or external rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or near, is not mine, I am not there, it is not my self.

24. “Monks, whatever intentions in the past, future or at present, internal or external, rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or near, is not mine, I am not there, it is not my self.

25. “Monks, whatever consciousness in the past, future or at present, internal or external rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or near, is not mine, I am not there, is not my self.

26. “Monks, to this, is said, the noble disciple gets rid does not heap: renounces does not grasp; turns out does not draw towards; and scatters does not make a thick smoke.

27. “What is got rid not heaped? Matter is got rid and not heaped. Feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness, are got rid not heaped.

28. “What is renounced and not grasped? Matter is renounced not grasped. Feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness, are renounced not grasped.

29. “What is turned out not drawn towards? Matter is turned out not drawn towards. Feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness, are turned out not drawn towards.

30. “What is scattered not made a thick smoke? Matter is scattered not made a thick smoke Feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness, are scattered not made a thick smoke.

31. “Monks, the learned noble disciple seeing it thus turns from matter, turns from feelings, turns from perceptions, turns from intentions and turns from consciousness. Turning, he looses interest. Loosing interest is released and knowledge arises I am released. He knows birth is destroyed, the holy life is lived to the end, duties are done and I have nothing more to wish.

32. “Monks, to this, it is said, the monk neither heaps nor gets rid, in getting rid, neither renounces nor grasps; in renouncing neither turns out nor draws towards; in getting rid neither scatters nor makes a thick smoke.

33. “In scattering what is neither heaped nor got rid? In getting rid matter is neither heaped nor got rid. In getting rid feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness are neither heaped nor got rid.

34. “In getting rid what is neither renounced nor grasped? In getting rid matter is neither renounced nor grasped. In getting rid feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness are neither renounced nor grasped.

35. “In renouncing what is neither turned out nor drawn towards? In renouncing matter is neither turned out nor drawn towards. In renouncing feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness are neither turned out nor drawn towards.

36. “In getting rid what is neither scattered nor made a thick smoke? In getting rid matter is neither scattered nor made a thick smoke. In getting rid feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness are neither scattered nor made a thick smoke.

37. “Monks, the thus scattered released mind is worshipped by gods together with Indra, Brahma, Pajapati from a distance.”

38. “We worship you thoroughbred of men! The most noble of men! Since we do not know where your mind is established.”

 

 

21. 2. 3. 8.

(80) Piṇḍolayaṃ - One Going For Alms Food

1. At one time the Blessed One was living with the Sakyas in Kapilavasthu in the monastery with the Banyan tree.

2. Then the Blessed One for some reason dismissing the Community of monks, wore robes and taking bowl and robes entered Kapilavathu for the alms round.

3. “Having gone the alms round in Kapilavathu, after the meal and returning from the alms round entered the Great Forest and sat at the root of a bamboo shoot to spend the day.

4. When in seclusion this thought and thought process occurred to the Blessed One:

5. “I have turned away the Community of monks. There are novices in this dispensation who have gone forth recently. Not seeing me they will have heartbreaks and would go away. Like a young calf who not seeing its mother would have a heartbreak and run away.

6. “In the same manner to the novices in this dispensation who have gone forth recently, not seeing me will cause a heartbreak and they would go away.

7. “What if I be helpful to the Community of monks at present, as I have been helpful to the Community of monks so far?”

8. Brahma Sahampati knowing the thought and thought process in the Blessed One's mind, as a strong man would stretch his bent arm or bend his stretched arm, disappeared from the world of Brahma and appeared before the Blessed One.

9. Then Brahma Sahampati arranging his robe on one shoulder and clasping hands towards the Blessed One said: “That's so Blessed One! That's so Well Gone One! The Community of monks is dismissed by the Blessed One.

10. “There are novices in this dispensation who have gone forth recently. Not seeing the Blessed One will cause a heartbreak and they would go away. Like a young calf who not seeing its mother would have a heartbreak and run away.

11. “In the same manner the novices in this dispensation who have gone forth recently. Not seeing the Blessed One will have heartbreaks and they would go away. Like seedlings not receiving moisture would dry and die.

12. “In the same manner the novices in this dispensation who have gone forth recently. Not seeing the Blessed One will have heartbreaks and they would go away.

13. “Venerable sir, may the Blessed One enjoy the presence of the Community. As the Blessed One had been helpful to the Community of monks so far, may the Blessed One be helpful to the Community of monks in the future too.”

14. The Blessed One accepted the entreaty silently.

15. Brahma Sahampati knowing that the Blessed One had accepted, worshipped, circumambulated the Blessed One and disappeared from there.

16. The Blessed One getting up from his seclusion approached the monastery with the Banyan tree, sat on the prepared seat and made a psychic intention thus: “May those monks attached to living alone approach me.”

17. Those monks attached to living alone approached the Blessed One, worshipped and sat on a side.

18. To the monks seated on a side the Blessed One said: “Monks, the livelihood by seeking alms food is one extremity. It's a curse to wander for alms food with bowl in hands. Yet monks, there are sons of clansmen who mindfully turn to it, neither frightened by the king, nor robbers, not because of a debt, or fear, and not because it is the only livelihood. Thinking, `We are the victims of birth, decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress,' it is only a few who make known the end of this mass of unpleasantness.

19. “Even among sons of clansmen who have gone forth with this intention there are covetous ones extremely greedy for sensuality, defiled, angry, not mindful and aware, not concentrated, with wandering minds, and with weak mental faculties. Monks, they are like a torch taken from a pyre burning on both ends and defiled in the middle, not suitable for firewood in the village and not suitable as the king's firewood. I compare these beings, decreased in household pleasures and not complete doing the work of recluses to that torch from the pyre.

20. “Monks, sensual thoughts, angry thoughts, and hurting thoughts are demerit. These three thoughts cease without anything remaining when the mind is well established in the four ways of establishing mindfulness, or else when the mind is developed in the concentration without a sign.

21. “Monks, it's suitable that you should develop the concentration without a sign. Developed and made much it brings many benefits and much fruit.

22. “Monks, these two are views, the view `to be, ` and the view `not to be'. About that the learned noble disciple reflects `Is there anything in the world to which I cling, without a fault?'

23. “He knows, `There is nothing in the world to which I cling,' and is without a fault. `Clinging, I cling to matter nothing else, to feelings, to perceptions, intentions and to consciousness nothing else. On account of my clinging there is `being.' On account of being, birth, decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and future birth.' Thus rise, the complete mass of unpleasantness.

24. “Monks, is matter permanent or impermanent?”

“Venerable sir, it is impermanent.”

“That which is impermanent, is it unpleasant or pleasant?”

“Venerable sir, it is unpleasant.”

“That which is impermanent, unpleasant and a changing thing is it suitable to be reflected,`It is mine, I am there, it is my self'?”

“That is not so, venerable sir.”

25-28. Monks, are feelings, perceptions, intentions or consciousness permanent or impermanent?”

“Venerable sir, they are impermanent.”

“That which is impermanent, is it unpleasant or pleasant?”

“Venerable sir, it is unpleasant.”

“That which is impermanent, unpleasant changing is it suitable to be reflected,`It is mine, I am there, it is my self'?”

“That is not so, venerable sir.

29. “Therefore monks, whatever matter, feelings ... re ... perceptions, intentions or consciousness in the past, future or at present, internal or external rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or near, is not mine, I am not there, it is not my self.

30. “Monks, the learned noble disciple seeing it thus turns from matter, turns from feelings, turns from perceptions, turns from intentions and turns from consciousness. Turning, he looses interest. Loosing interest, is released and knowledge arises, `I am released.' He knows, `Birth is destroyed, the holy life is lived to the end, duties are done and there is nothing more to wish.'”

 

21. 2. 3. 9.

(81) Pārileyya - In the Parileyya Forest

1, At one time the Blessed One was living in Kosambi, in the monastery offered by Ghosita.

2. Then the Blessed One wore robes in the morning and taking bowl and robes entered Kosambi for the alms round. After partaking the meal and returning from the alms round, the Blessed One arranged the dwelling himself, taking bowl and robes, not wishing for an attendant, left on a tour alone.

3. Soon after the Blessed One had left, a certain monk approached venerable Ānanda and said: “Friend, Ānanda, the Blessed One arranged the dwelling himself, taking bowl and robes, not wishing an attendant and not expecting anything from the Community of monks, left on a tour by himself.”

4. “Friends at a time the Blessed One arranges the dwelling himself, takes bowl and robes, not wishing an attendant and not expecting anything from the Community of monks, leaves on a tour by himself, it is not suitable that we should follow him.”

5. Then the Blessed One touring gradually entered the Parileyya forest and made his dwelling at the root of a huge Sala tree.

6. Then many monks approached venerable Ānanda, exchanged friendly greetings and sat on a side and said:

7. “Friend, Ānanda, since long we have not been advised by the Blessed One, we would like to be advised by the Blessed One.”

8. Then venerable Ānanda approached the Blessed One dwelling at the root of the Sala tree in the Parileyya forest with those monks, worshipped and sat on a side.

9. The Blessed One advised, aroused, incited. and made their hearts light with a talk.

10. At that time this doubt was worrying the mind of a certain monk: `Seeing how and knowing how are the uninterrupted desires destroyed?'

11. Then the Blessed One knowing the thought and thought process in that monk's mind addressed the monks: “Monks, my Teaching is for investigating. What things are for investigation? The fourfold ways of establishing mindfulness, the fourfold endeavors, the psychic attainments, the fivefold mental faculties, the five powers, the seven enlightenment factors and the Eightfold Path. Monks, these things are preached by me for investigating the Teaching.

12. “Monks, these things are preached by me for investigating the Teaching, yet it occurs in a certain monk's mind `Seeing and knowing what do the uninterrupted desires in me, get destroyed?'

13. “Monks, seeing and knowing what do the train of uninterrupted desires get destroyed?

14.-16. “Here, monks, the not learned ordinary man who has not seen noble ones, or heard their Teaching, not trained and not clever in their Teaching, has not seen Great Beings, or heard their Teaching, not trained and not clever in their Teaching, reflects matter from self, those reflections are intentions. From what do those intentions originate, take birth and increase? Craving arises to a not learned ordinary man on account of feelings born from the contact of not knowing and intentions rise from craving. Thus monks those intentions are impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen. Craving is impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen. Feelings are impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen. Contact is impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen, and ignorance too is impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen. Monks, seeing and knowing thus the uninterrupted desires get destroyed.

17. “Even if he does not reflect matter from self, he reflects a material self, those reflections are intentions. From what do those intentions originate, take birth and increase? Craving arises to a not learned ordinary man on account of feelings born from the contact of not knowing and intentions rise from craving. Thus monks those intentions are impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen. Craving is impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen. Feelings are impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen. Contact is impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen, and ignorance too is impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen. Monks, seeing and knowing thus the uninterrupted desires get destroyed.

18. “Even if he does not reflect matter from self or a material self, he reflects matter in self. Those reflections are intentions. From what do those intentions originate, take birth and increase? Craving arises to a not learned ordinary man on account of feelings born from the contact of not knowing and intentions rise from craving. Thus monks those intentions are impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen. Craving is impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen. Feelings are impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen. Contact is impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen, and ignorance too is impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen. Monks, seeing thus and knowing thus the uninterrupted desires get destroyed.

19. “Even if he does not reflect, matter from self, a material self, or in self matter, he reflects a self in matter those reflections are intentions. From what do those intentions originate, take birth and increase? Craving arises to a not learned ordinary man on account of feelings born from the contact of not knowing and intentions rise from craving. Thus monks those intentions are impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen. Craving is impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen. Feelings are impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen. Contact is impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen, and ignorance too is impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen. Monks, seeing and knowing thus the uninterrupted desires get destroyed.

20. “Even if he does not reflect matter from self, a material self, or in self matter, or a self in matter ... re ...

21. “Yet he reflects feelings from self, a feeling self, or in self feelings, or a self in feelings ... re ...

22. “Even if he does not reflect, feelings from self, a feeling self, or in self feelings or a self in feelings, yet he reflects perceptions from self, a perceiving self, or in self perceptions, or self in perceptions.

23. “Even if he does not reflect, perceptions from self, a perceiving self, or in self perceptions, or self in perceptions, yet he reflects intentions from self, an intending self, or in self intentions, or a self in intentions.

24. “Even if he does not reflect, intentions from self, an intending self, or in self intentions, or self in intentions, yet he reflects consciousness from self, a conscious self, or in self consciousness, or a self in consciousness. Monks, those reflections are intentions. From what do those intentions originate, take birth and increase? Craving arises to a not learned ordinary man on account of feelings born from the contact of not knowing and intentions rise from craving. Thus monks those intentions are impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen. Craving is impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen. Feelings are impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen. Contact is impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen, and ignorance too is impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen. Monks, seeing and knowing thus the uninterrupted desires get destroyed.

25. “Even if he does not reflect matter from self, feelings from self, perceptions from self, intentions from self and consciousness from self, yet there is this view, the self and the world afterwards will be permanent and will be forever without change.

“Monks this view of eternity are intentions. From what do those intentions originate, take birth and increase?.. re ... Monks, seeing and knowing thus the uninterrupted desires get destroyed.

26. “Even if he does not reflect matter from self, feelings from self, perceptions from self, intentions from self and consciousness from self and does not bear the view, the self and the world afterwards will be permanent and will be forever without change. Yet he bears this view, `I was not, I am no, I will not be, there will not be to me.'

27. “Monks, this view of annihilation is intention. From what do intentions originate, take birth, and increase?.. re ... Monks, seeing and knowing thus the uninterrupted desires get destroyed.

28. “Even if he does not reflect matter from self, feelings from self, perceptions from self, intentions from self and consciousness from self ... re ... or self in consciousness and does not bear the view, the self and the world afterwards will be permanent and will be forever without change and does not bear this view, `I was not, I am not, I will not be, there will not be to me,' Yet he doubts and doubts and does not place complete faith in the good Teaching

29. “Monks, those doubts without complete faith in the good Teaching are intentions. From what do those intentions originate, take birth and increase? Craving arises to a not learned ordinary man on account of feelings born from the contact of non-knowing and intentions rise from craving. Thus monks those intentions are impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen. Craving is impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen. Feelings are impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen. Contact is impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen, and ignorance too is impermanent, compounded, dependently arisen.

30. “Monks, seeing and knowing thus the uninterrupted desires get destroyed.”

 

21. 2. 3. 10.

(82) Puṇṇamā - On a Full Moon Day

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the Pubba monastery, the palace of Migara's mother in Sāvatthi, with a large number of monks

2. On that full moon day, the Blessed One was seated in open space surrounded by the community of monks.

3. Then a certain monk got up from his seat, arranged his robe on one shoulder, clasped hands towards the Blessed One and said: “Venerable sir, we like to ask a certain question, if the Blessed One would kindly explain it.”

“Then monk, take your seat and ask your question.”

4. That monk agreeing sat on his seat and said: “Venerable sir, are the five holding masses the holding mass of matter, feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness?”

“Monk, the five holding masses are the holding masses of matter, feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness.”

5. That monk accepted and delighted in the words of the Blessed One asked a further question: “Venerable sir, what is the origin of these five holding masses?”

“Monk, the origin of these five holding masses is interest.”

6. That monk accepted and delighted in the words of the Blessed One and asked a further question: “Venerable sir, is the seizing the holding of the five masses, or is the holding something else, other than the five holding masses?”

“Monk, it is not seizing the five holding masses nor is there seizing other than the five holding masses, yet it is seizing the five holding masses with interest and greed.”

7. That monk accepted and delighted in the words of the Blessed One and asked a further question: “Venerable sir, are there differences in seizing the five holding masses?”

“Monk, there are differences in seizing the five holding masses. Monk, to a certain one it occurs thus, `In the future may my matter be thus. In the future may my feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness, be thus.' Monk, in this manner there are differences in seizing the five holding masses.

8. That monk accepted and delighted in the words of the Blessed One, asked a further question: “Venerable sir, could a synonym be given to the word masses?”

“Monk, all matter in the past, future or at present, seized or not, rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or near, all that is matter. All feelings, .. re ... all perceptions, .. re ... all intentions, .. re ... all consciousness in the past, future or at present, seized or not, rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or near, all that is consciousness. This is a synonym for the masses.”

9. That monk accepted and delighted in the words of the Blessed One, asked a further question: “Venerable sir, based on what reasons is the mass of matter made evident? Based on what reasons is the mass of feelings made evident? Based on what reasons is the mass of perceptions made evident? Based on what reasons is the mass of intentions made evident? And based on what reasons is the mass of consciousness made evident?”

“Based on the four primary elements the mass of matter is revealed. Based on contacts the mass of feelings are revealed. Based on contacts the mass of perceptions are revealed. Based on contacts the mass of intentions are revealed. And based on name and matter the mass of consciousness is revealed.”

10. That monk accepted and delighted in the words of the Blessed One, asked a further question: “Venerable sir, how does the view of a self come about?”

“Here, monk, the not learned ordinary man who has not seen noble ones, or heard their Teaching, not trained and clever in their Teaching, has not seen Great Beings, or heard their Teaching, not trained and clever in their Teaching, reflects matter from self, or a material self, or in self matter, or in matter self. Reflects feelings from self, or a feeling self, or in self feelings, or in feelings self.

“Reflects perceptions from self, or a perceiving self, or in self perceptions or in perceptions self. Reflects intentions in self, or an intending self, or in self intentions, or in intentions self. Reflects consciousness from self, or a conscious self, or in self consciousness, or in consciousness self. Monk, this is the view of a self.”

11. That monk accepted and delighted in the words of the Blessed One, asked a further question: “Venerable sir, how does the view of self cease?”

“Here, monk, the learned noble disciple who has seen noble ones, heard their Teaching, trained and clever in their Teaching, has seen Great Beings, and heard their Teaching, trained and clever in their Teaching, does not reflect matter from self, or a material self, or in self matter, or in matter self. Does not reflect feelings from self, or a feeling self, or in self feelings, or in feelings self.

“Does not reflect perceptions from self, or a perceiving self, or in self perceptions or in perceptions self. Does not reflect intentions from self, or an intending self, or in self intentions, or in intentions self. Does not reflect .consciousness from self, or a conscious self, or in self consciousness, or in consciousness self. Monk, thus cease the view of self.”

12. That monk accepted and delighted in the words of the Blessed One, asked a further question: “Venerable sir, what is the satisfaction, danger, and escape from matter from feelings, from perceptions, from intentions .and from consciousness?”

“Monk, the pleasantness and pleasure that rise on account of matter, is its satisfaction. That matter is impermanent, unpleasant, changing is its danger and the taming of interest and greed and dispelling the interest and greed is the escape from matter.

“The pleasantness and pleasure that rise on account of feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness are their satisfaction. Feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness are impermanent, unpleasant, changing is the danger and the taming of interest and greed and dispelling interest and greed is the escape from. feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness.”

13. That monk accepted and delighted in the words of the Blessed One, asked a further question: “Venerable sir, knowing what and seeing what in this sixfold conscious body and all external signs do the latent tendencies of measuring as `I am and mine' do not arise?”

“Monk, all matter, in the past, in time to come and at present, seized or not, rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or in the vicinity, is not mine, I am not that, it's not my self. This should be seen as it really is with right wisdom. All feelings, all perceptions, all intentions and all consciousness in the past, in time to come and at present, seized or not, rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or in the vicinity, is not mine, I am not that, it's not my self. This should be seen as it really is with right wisdom. Monk, knowing and seeing this sixfold conscious body and all external signs in this manner the latent tendencies of measuring as `I am and mine' do not arise.

14. Hearing this, to a certain monk this thought and thought process arose: `So then, friends, matter is not self. Feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness are not self. How could actions done by no self, contact the self?'

15. The Blessed One knowing that monk's thought and thought process addressed the monks: “Monks, there is a possibility that a certain foolish man not knowing and overcome by craving should go beyond the dispensation of the Teacher thinking `So then friends, matter is not self. Feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness are not self. How could actions done by no self, contact the self?' Monks, I have trained you in these and other things putting across a series of questions:”

16. “Monks, is matter permanent or impermanent?”

“Venerable sir, it is impermanent.”

“That which is impermanent, is it unpleasant or pleasant?”

“Venerable sir, it is unpleasant.”

“That which is impermanent, unpleasant, changing is it suitable to be reflected, `It is mine, I am there, it is my self?'”

“That is not so venerable. Sir.”

17-19. “Monks, are feelings, perceptions, and intentions, permanent or impermanent?”

“Venerable sir, they are impermanent.”

“Those which are impermanent are they unpleasant or pleasant?”

“Venerable sir, they are unpleasant.”

“Those which are impermanent, unpleasant, changing are they suitable to be reflected, they are mine, I am there, they are my self?”

“That is not so, venerable sir.”

20. Monks, is consciousness permanent or impermanent?”

“Venerable sir, it is impermanent.”

“That which is impermanent, is it unpleasant or pleasant?”

“Venerable sir, it is unpleasant.”

“That which is impermanent, unpleasant changing is it suitable to be reflected,`It is mine, I am there, it is my self'?”

“That is not so, venerable. Sir.”

21. “Therefore monks, the learned noble disciple seeing it thus turns from matter, turns from feelings, turns from perceptions, turns from intentions and turns from consciousness. Turning looses interest. Loosing interest is released and knowledge arises I am released. He knows birth is destroyed, the holy life is lived to the end, duties are done and there is nothing more to wish.

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There are two about the masses, giving a synonym and reasons
The Teacher said twice from satisfaction to consciousness.
This is told in ten ways and the monks were questioned.