Sutta Pitaka
Saṃyutta Nikāya
Division III - Khandhaka
Book 21 - Khandha Saṃyutta
Section 1 - The Root Fifty
Chapter 1 - Nakulapitu (Paṭhamo) Vagga

Namo tassa bhagavato arahato sammā sambuddhassa

 

21. 1. 1. 1.

(1) Nakulapita - Nakula Father

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the deer park in the Bhesakala forest among the Suṃsumāra rocks.

2. Then the householder Nakula father approached the Blessed One sat on a side and said:

3. “Venerable sir, I am now decayed, aged, come to the end of my life, forever with an ailing body. I am helped to see impermanence, by the monks who do the development of the mind. Venerable sir, Blessed One, advice me, for my welfare and happiness for a long time.”

4. “Householder, your body is ailing, that's right. If anyone maintaining a body should acknowledge that he is without ailments even for a moment, it is nothing but foolishness. Therefore, householder, you should train in this manner: `My body ails, my mind will be without ailments.' Thus should be the training.”

5. Then the householder Nakula delighted and accepted the words of the Blessed One, got up from his seat, worshipped, circumambulated the Blessed One, and approached venerable Sāriputta, worshipped him, and sat on a side.

6. To the seated householder Nakula, venerable Sāriputta said: “Householder, your face is very pleasant, your mental faculties seem clear, and the complexion of your face is pure. Did you hear a sermon from the Blessed One?”

“Venerable sir, why isn't it so? The Blessed One has just spoken to me and I am sprinkled with deathlessness.”

“Householder, in which manner did the Blessed One speak to you and how were you sprinkled with deathlessness?”

7. “Venerable sir, I approached the Blessed One worshipped and sat on a side and said:

“`Venerable sir, I am now decayed, aged, come to the end of life, my body is ailing, I am helped to see impermanence by the monks who do the development of the mind. Venerable sir, Blessed One, advise me, for my welfare and happiness for a long time'.”

“Then the Blessed One said to me: `Householder, your body is ailing, that's right. If anyone maintaining a body, should acknowledge that he is without ailments even for a moment, it is nothing but foolishness. Therefore householder you should train in this manner, my body is ailing, my mind will be without ailments. Thus should be the training.'

“Venerable sir, in this manner I was advised and sprinkled with deathlessness.”

8. “`Householder, did you not cross question the Blessed One on this, asking: `Venerable sir what is an ailing body and an ailing mind? What is an ailing body and a non ailing mind?'”

9. “Venerable sir, Sāriputta, we came from afar to know the meaning of this, it is good that the meaning occurs to venerable Sāriputta.”

10. “Then, householder, listen and attend carefully.”

The householder Nakula father said “Yes venerable sir.”

11. Venerable Sāriputta said:

“Householder, what is an ailing body and an ailing mind?

12. “Here householder, the ordinary man who has not seen noble ones or Great Beings or heard their Teaching and not clever in their Teaching, reflects matter from self [1] or a material self or in self matter or in matter self. Or his mind is rooted in a preposition `I am matter, it's my matter' that matter changes on account of that change arise grief, lamentation, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress.

13. “He reflects feelings from self or a feeling self or in self feelings or in feelings self. Or his mind is rooted in a preposition `I am feelings, they are my feelings'. Those feelings change and on account of that change arise grief, lamentation, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress.

14. “He reflects perceptions from self, or a perceiving self, or in self perceptions, or in perceptions self. Or his mind is rooted in a preposition `I am perceptions, they are my perceptions.' Those perceptions change and on account of that change arise grief, lamentation, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress.

15. “He reflects intentions from self, or an intending self, or in self intentions, or in intentions self. Or his mind is rooted in a preposition `I am intentions, they are mine.' Those intentions change and on account of that change arise grief, lamentation, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress.

16. “He reflects consciousness from self, or a conscious self, or in self consciousness, or in consciousness self. Or his mind is rooted in a preposition `I am consciousness, it's mine.' That consciousness changes and on account of that change arise grief, lamentation, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress.

17. “Householder, this is the ailing body and the ailing mind.

18. “Householder, what is an ailing body and a non-ailing mind?

19. “Here, householder, the learned noble disciple who has seen noble ones and Great Beings, heard their Teaching, and is clever in that Teaching, does not reflect matter from self, or a material self, or in self matter, or in matter self and his mind is not rooted in a preposition, `I am matter, it's mine.' That matter changes and on account of that change grief, lamentation, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress do not arise.

20. “He does not reflect feelings from self, or a feeling self, or in self feelings, or in feelings self, and his mind is not rooted in a preposition `I am feelings, they are mine' those feelings change. On account of that change, grief, lamentation, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress do not arise.

21. “He does not reflect perceptions from self, or a perceiving self, or in self perceptions, or in perceptions self and his mind is not rooted in a preposition `I am perceptions, they are mine'. Those perceptions change and on account of that change grief, lamentation, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress do not arise.

22. “He does not reflect intentions from self, or an intending self or in self intentions or in intentions self and his mind is not rooted in a preposition `I am intentions, they are mine'. Those intentions change and on account of that change grief, lamentation, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress do not arise.

23. “He does not reflect consciousness from self, or a conscious self, or in self consciousness, or in consciousness self and his mind is not rooted in a preposition `I am consciousness, it's mine'. That consciousness changes and on account of that change grief, lamentation, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress do not arise.

24. “Householder, this is the ailing body and the non ailing mind.”

25. Venerable Sāriputta said thus and the householder Nakula father delighted in the words of venerable Sāriputta.

 

21. 1. 1. 2.

(2) Devadaha - At Devadaha

I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living with the Sakyas in a hamlet called Devadaha.

2. Then many monks who wanted to go to the western states approached the Blessed One worshipped and sat on a side.

3. Seated on a side those monks said to the Blessed One: “Venerable sir, we wish to go to the western states and make dwellings there.”

“Monks did you speak about this with Sāriputta?”

“Venerable sir, we did not speak about this with venerable Sāriputta.”

“Monks, speak with Sāriputta. He is wise and helpful to the co-associates in the holy life.”

Those monks replied, “Yes, venerable sir.”

4. At that time venerable Sāriputta was seated in a certain ringworm shrub not far away from the Blessed One.

5. Then those monks delighted and agreed with the Blessed One, got up from their seats worshipped and circumambulated the Blessed One and approached venerable Sāriputta, exchanged friendly conversation and sat on a side.

6. The seated monks said thus to venerable Sāriputta:

“Friend, Sāriputta, we wish to go to the western states and make dwellings there, we have spoken to the Teacher about this.”

7. “Friends, in various kingdoms there are monks, who are wise warriors, wise brahmins, wise householders and also wise recluses. Monks, humans are wise and are of the nature of searching, what the view of the teacher is and what he teaches. How much of the Teaching has the venerable ones heard, absorbed, wisely penetrated and explaining would tell what the Blessed One had said and would explain in accordance with the Teaching without making any blames.”

8. “Friend, Sāriputta, we came from afar to know the meaning of these words from venerable Sāriputta. Good, if venerable Sāriputta explains the meaning of these words to us.”

9. “Then friends, listen and attend carefully, I will tell.”

Those monks replied “Yes friend we will and venerable Sāriputta said thus:

10. “Friends, in various kingdoms there are monks, who are wise warriors, wise brahmins, wise householders and also wise recluses who are of the nature of searching, if asked, `What is the view of your teacher and what does he teach?' It should be, `The Teacher tells us to tame interest and greed.'

11. “Friends, when explained thus too there is a possibility the wise warriors, brahmins and recluses would ask a further question, `To tame interest and greed for what, does the venerable ones' Teacher instruct? Friends, the Teacher instructs us to tame interest and greed for matter, feelings, perceptions, intentions, and for consciousness.

12. Friends, when explained thus too there is a possibility that the wise warriors, or brahmins could be searching and would ask a further question, seeing what danger does the venerable ones' Teacher instruct? To tame interest and greed for matter, feelings, perceptions, intentions and consciousness?' Friends, when asked thus you should explain thus. `Friends, when interest and greed, love, thirst, lament, and craving for matter is not dispelled, when that matter, feelings, perceptions, intentions and consciousness change, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress arise; and when interest, greed, love, thirst, lament and craving for feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness are dispelled, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress do not arise. Friends, seeing this danger our Teacher has declared to tame interest and greed for matter, feelings, perceptions, intentions and consciousness.'

13. “Friends, when explained thus too there is a possibility, for the wise warriors, brahmins, and recluses to ask a further question, “Seeing what benefit does the venerable ones' Teacher instruct? To tame interest and greed for matter?' Friends, when asked thus you should explain thus. `Friends, when interest and greed, love, thirst, lament and craving for matter, feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness are dispelled, when that matter, feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness change, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress do not arise. Friends, seeing this benefit our Teacher has declared to tame interest and greed for matter, feelings, perceptions, intentions and consciousness.'

14. “Friends if leading a life with demerit here and now is pleasant, without trouble, without worry, and lament and also after death a good birth could be desired, the Blessed One would not have declared the dispelling of demerit in this life.

15. “Since, friends, someone leading a life of demerit is here and now unpleasant, with trouble, with worry, with lament and also after death could desire an evil state, the Blessed One has declared the dispelling of demerit in this life.

16. “Friends if leading a life of merit here and now is unpleasant, with trouble, with worry, with lament and also after death an evil birth could be desired, the Blessed One would not have declared the accumulation of merit in this life.

17. “Since, friends, someone leading a life of merit is here and now pleasant, without trouble, without worry and lament and also after death could desire a good birth the Blessed One has declared the accumulation of merit in this life.”

18. Venerable Sāriputta said thus and those monks delighted in the words of venerable Sāriputta.

 

21. 1. 1. 3.

(3) Hāliddakāni I - The Householder Hāliddākani I

1. I heard thus. At one time venerable Mahākaccāna was living in a house where there was a tree in which hawks lived.

2. Then the householder Hāliddakāni approached venerable Mahākaccāna worshipped and sat on a side.

3. Sitting the householder Hāliddakāni said thus to venerable Mahākaccāna: “Venrable sir, answering Magandiya's question in the Aṭṭhaka Vagga the Blessed One had said:

`Leaving the household he goes homeless,
Does not make any associations in the village
Free from sensuality does not desire them.
How is it, he has no disputes with people.'

“Venerable sir, of this short exposition of the Blessed One how should we know the detailed meaning?”

4-7. “Householder, the material element is the habitation of consciousness and the greedy bond with the material element is the behavior of consciousness in that habitation. Householder, the feeling element is the habitation of consciousness and the greedy bond with the feeling element is the behavior of consciousness in that habitation. Householder, the perceiving element is the habitation of consciousness and the greedy bond with the perceiving element is the behavior of consciousness in that habitation. Householder, the intending element is the habitation of consciousness and the greedy bond with the intending element is the behavior of consciousness in that habitation.

“Householder, these are the sheltered behaviors of consciousness.

8. Householder what is the lack of shelter for behavior?

9. “Householder, the Thus Gone One has dispelled, pulled out with the roots, made a palm stump, and made not to grow again whatever interest, greed, liking, craving and the latent tendency to settle in the material element. Therefore it is said, `The Thus Gone One has no shelter for behaviors.'

10. “The Thus Gone One has dispelled, pulled out with the roots, made a palm stump, and made not to grow again the interest, greed, liking and the craving for the latent tendency to settle in the feeling element. Therefore, it is said `The Thus Gone One has no shelter for behaviors.'

11. “The Thus Gone One has dispelled, pulled out with the roots, made a palm stump, and made not to grow again the interest, greed, liking and the craving. for the latent tendency to settle in the perceiving element. Therefore it is said, `The Thus Gone One has no shelter for behaviors.'

12. The Thus Gone One has dispelled, pulled out with the roots, made a palm stump, and made not to grow again the greed, liking and the craving for the latent tendency to settle in the intending element. Therefore it is said. `The Thus Gone One has no shelter for behaviors.'

13. “The Thus Gone One has dispelled, pulled out with the roots, made a palm stump, and made not to grow again the interest, greed, liking and the craving for the latent tendency to settle in the conscious element. Therefore it is said, `The Thus Gone One has no shelter for behaviors.'

14. “Householder, in this manner there is no shelter for behaviors.

15. “Householder, what is the behavior in a settlement?

“Householder, to be bound to a sign of form is a settlement, to be bound to a sign of sound is a settlement, to be bound to a sign of scents is a settlement, to be bound to a sign of taste is a settlement, to be bound to a sign of touch is a settlement, to be bound to a sign of an idea is a settlement. Householder, to this is said a settlement.

16. “Householder, what is non-behavior in a settlement?

“Householder, the Thus Gone One has dispelled, pulled out with the roots, made a palm stump, and made not to grow again the settlement, bound to a sign of form, a sign of sound, a sign of scents, a sign of taste, a sign of touch and the settlement, bound to a sign of an idea. Therefore, the Thus Gone has no behavior in settlements.

17. “Householder, this is non-behavior in settlements.

18. “Householder, how is there associations with the village?

`“Here, householder, a certain one associates the village with interest, grieving with the grief stricken, happy with the happy and unhappy with the unhappy. When there are some duties to be done, he yokes himself to do those duties. Householder, in this manner there is association in the village

19. “Householder, how is there no associations with the village?

“Here, householder, the monk does not associate the village with interest. He does not grieve with the grief stricken, is not happy with the happy and not unhappy with the unhappy. When there are some duties to be done, he does not yoke himself to do those duties. Householder, in this manner there are no associations in the village.

20. “Householder, how is there no freedom from sensuality?

“Here, householder, a certain one is not free from greed, interest, love, thirst, lament and craving for sensual desires. Thus householder, he is not free from sensuality.

21. “Householder, how is there freedom from sensuality?

“Here, householder, a certain one is free from greed, interest, love, thirst, lament and craving for sensual desires. Thus householder, he is free from sensuality.

22. “Householder, how is there longing for the future?

“Here, householder, it occurs to a certain one, I should be of this matter in the future, of these feelings in the future, of these perceptions, of these intentions in the future, of this consciousness in the future. Householder, this is longing the future.

23. “Householder, how is there no longing for the future?

“Here, householder, it does not occur to a certain one, I should be of this matter in the future, of these feelings in the future, of these perceptions, of these intentions in the future, of this consciousness in the future. Householder, this is not longing the future.

24. “Householder, how is there a dispute with the people?

“Here, householder, a certain one disputes. `You do not know this Discipline. I know the Discipline. What do you know of this Discipline? You have fallen to the wrong method. I have fallen to the right method. What have to be told first, you tell later. What has to be told last, you tell first. I talk with reasons, you talk without reason. You interrupt the flow and turn back You, dispute affectedly. If possible be released in a dispute. You have grasped it wrong, if possible penetrate it. Thus householder, there is a dispute with the people'.

25. “Householder, how is there no dispute with the people?

“Here, householder, a certain one does not dispute. `You do not know this Discipline. I know the Discipline. What do you know of this Discipline? You have fallen to the wrong method. I have fallen to the right method. What have to be told first, you tell later. What has to be told later, you tell first. I talk with reasons, you talk without reason. You interrupt the flow and turn back Your dispute is affected. If possible be released in a dispute. You have grasped it wrong, if possible penetrate it. Thus householder, there is no dispute with the people'

26. “Thus householder, answering Magandiya's question in the Aṭṭhaka Vagga the Blessed One had said:

`Leaving the household he goes homeless,
Does not make any associations in the village
Free from sensuality does not desire them.
How is it, he has no disputes with people.'

“Householder, of this short exposition of the Blessed One this is the detailed meaning.”

 

21. 1. 1. 4.

@@@4. (4) Hāiddakāni II - The Householder Hāliddakāni II

1. I heard thus. At one time venerable Mahākaccāna was living in a house where there was a tree in which hawks lived.

2. Then the householder Hāliddakāni approached venerable Mahākaccāna worshipped and sat on a side.

3. Sitting the householder Hāliddakāni said thus to venerable Mahākaccāna:

4. “Venerable sir, answering Sakka's question the Blessed One had said:

`The recluses and brahmins released with the destruction of craving are perpetually perfected, have thoroughly ended unpleasantness, perpetually lead the holy life, have thoroughly come to the end of the holy life and are the chief among gods and men,'

“Venerable sir, of this short exposition of the Blessed One how should we know the detailed meaning?”

5. “Householder, whatever their interest, greed, likings, cravings, and the latent tendency of the mind, holding to this and that element of matter, are destroyed, calmed, ceased, given up, and the mind is well released it is said.

6. “Whatever their interest, greed, likings, cravings, and the latent tendency of the mind, holding to this and that element of feelings, are destroyed, calmed, ceased, given up, and the mind is well released it is said.

7. “Whatever their interest, greed, likings, cravings, and the latent tendency of the mind, holding to this and that element of perceptions, are destroyed, calmed, ceased, given up, and the mind is well released it is said.

8. “Whatever their interest, greed, likings, cravings, and the latent tendency of the mind, holding to this and that element of intentions, are destroyed, calmed, ceased, given up, and the mind is well released it is said.

9. “Householder, whatever their interest, greed, likings, cravings, and the latent tendency of the mind, holding to this and that element of consciousness, are destroyed, calmed, ceased, given up, and the mind is well released it is said.

10. “Householder, answering Sakka's question the Blessed One had said:

`The recluses and brahmins released with the destruction of craving are perpetually perfected, have thoroughly ended unpleasantness, perpetually lead the holy life, have thoroughly come to the end of the holy life and are the chief among gods and men.' This should be known as the detailed meaning to this short exposition given by the Blessed One.”

 

21. 1. 1. 5.

(5) Samadhi - Concentration

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta's grove in Sāvatthi.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks: “Monks, develop concentration. The concentrated monk sees it, as it really is.

3. What does he see as it really is? He sees the arising of matter and the fading of matter, the arising of feelings and the fading of feelings, the arising of perceptions and the fading of perceptions, the arising of intentions and the fading of intentions and the arising of consciousness and the fading of consciousness.

4. Monks, what is, the arising of matter the arising of feelings, the arising of perceptions, the arising of intentions and the arising of consciousness?

5. Monks, there is rejoicing, a declaration and an attachment. For what is there rejoicing, a declaration and an attachment?

6. There is rejoicing for matter, a declaration for matter and attachment for matter. When there is rejoicing, declaration for and attachment for matter, there arise enjoyment. Enjoyment in matter is attachment. On account of that attachment is being. On account of being is birth. On account of birth, decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress arise. Thus rises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

7. There is rejoicing for feelings, a declaration for feelings and attachment for feelings. When there is rejoicing, declaration and attachment for feelings, there arise enjoyment. Enjoyment in feelings is attachment. On account of that attachment is being. On account of being is birth. On account of birth, decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress arise. Thus rises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

8. There is rejoicing for perceptions, a declaration for perceptions and attachment for perceptions. When there is rejoicing, declaration and attachment there arise enjoyment in it. Enjoyment in perceptions is attachment. On account of that attachment is being. On account of being is birth. On account of birth, decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress arise. Thus rises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

9. There is rejoicing for intentions, a declaration for intentions and attachment for intentions. When there is rejoicing, declaration and attachment for intentions, there arise enjoyment. Enjoyment in intentions is attachment. On account of that attachment is being. On account of being is birth. On account of birth, decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress arise Thus rises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

10. There is rejoicing for consciousness, a declaration for consciousness and attachment for consciousness. When there is rejoicing, declaration and attachment for consciousness, there arise enjoyment in it. Enjoyment in consciousness is attachment. On account of that attachment is being. On account of being is birth. On account of birth decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress arise Thus rises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

11. Monks, this is the arising of matter, the arising of feelings, the arising of perceptions, the arising of intentions and the arising of consciousness.

12. Monks, what is the fading of matter, the fading of feelings, the fading of perceptions, the fading of intentions and the fading of consciousness?

Here there is no rejoicing, no declaration and no attachment. For what is there no rejoicing, no declaration and no attachment?

13. There is no rejoicing, no declaration and no attachment for matter. When there is no rejoicing, declaration or attachment for matter, the enjoyment for matter ceases. With the cessation of enjoyment for matter attachment ceases. With the cessation of attachment being ceases. With the cessation of being, birth, decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress cease. Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.

14. There is no rejoicing, no declaration, and no attachment for feelings. When there is no rejoicing, declaration or attachment for feelings, the enjoyment in feelings, ceases. With the cessation of enjoyment for feelings attachment ceases. With the cessation of attachment being ceases. With the cessation of being, birth, decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress cease. Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.

15. There is no rejoicing, no declaration, and no attachment for perceptions. When there is no rejoicing, declaration or attachment for perceptions the enjoyment in perceptions ceases. With the cessation of enjoyment for perceptions attachment ceases. With the cessation of attachment being ceases. With the cessation of being, birth, decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress cease Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.

16. There is no rejoicing, no declaration, and no attachment for intentions. When there is no rejoicing, declaration or attachment for intentions the enjoyment for intentions ceases. With the cessation of enjoyment for intentions attachment ceases. With the cessation of attachment being ceases. With the cessation of being, birth, decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress cease. Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.

17. There is no rejoicing, no declaration, and no attachment for consciousness. When there is no rejoicing, no declaration and no attachment for consciousness, the enjoyment for consciousness ceases. With the cessation of enjoyment for consciousness attachment ceases. With the cessation of attachment being ceases. With the cessation of being, birth, decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress cease. Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.

18. Monks, this is the cessation of matter, the cessation of feelings, the cessation of perceptions, the cessation of intentions and the cessation of consciousness.

 

21. 1. 1. 6.

(6) Paṭisallana - Seclusion

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta's grove in Sāvatthi.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks: “Monks, apply yourself to seclusion. The secluded monk sees it, as it really is.

3. What does he see as it really is? He sees the arising of matter, the fading of matter, the arising of feelings, the fading of feelings, the arising of perceptions, the fading of perceptions, the arising of intentions, the fading of intentions and the arising of consciousness, the fading of consciousness.

4. Monks, what is, the arising of matter the arising of feelings, the arising of perceptions, the arising of intentions and the arising of consciousness?

5. Monks, there is rejoicing, a declaration and an attachment. For what is there rejoicing, declaration and attachment?

6. There is rejoicing for matter, a declaration for matter and attachment for matter. When there is rejoicing, declaration and attachment for matter, there arise enjoyment. Enjoyment in matter is attachment. On account of that attachment is being. On account of being is birth. On account of birth, decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress arise. Thus arises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

7. There is rejoicing for feelings, a declaration for feelings and attachment for feelings. When there is rejoicing, declaration and attachment for feelings, there arise enjoyment. Enjoyment in feelings is attachment. On account of that attachment is being. On account of being is birth. On account of birth, decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress arise. Thus arises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

8. There is rejoicing for perceptions, a declaration for perceptions and attachment for perceptions. When there is rejoicing, declaration and attachment for perceptions, there arise enjoyment. Enjoyment in perceptions is attachment. On account of that attachment is being. On account of being is birth. On account of birth, decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress arise. Thus rises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

9. There is rejoicing for intentions, a declaration for intentions and attachment for intentions. When there is rejoicing, declaration and attachment for intentions, there arise enjoyment in it. Enjoyment in intentions is attachment. On account of that attachment is being. On account of being is birth. On account of birth, decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress arise Thus rises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

10. There is rejoicing for consciousness, a declaration for consciousness and attachment for consciousness. When there is rejoicing, declaration and attachment for consciousness, there arise enjoyment. Enjoyment in consciousness is attachment. On account of that attachment is being. On account of being is birth. On account of birth decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress arise Thus rises the complete mass of unpleasantness.

11. Monks, this is the arising of matter, the arising of feelings, the arising of perceptions, the arising of intentions and the arising of consciousness.

12. Monks, what is the fading of matter, the fading of feelings, the fading of perceptions, the fading of intentions and the fading of consciousness?

Monks, there is no rejoicing, no declaration and no attachment. For what is there no rejoicing, declaration and attachment?

13. There is no rejoicing, no declaration and no attachment for matter. When there is no rejoicing, no declaration, and no attachment for matter, the enjoyment for matter ceases. With the cessation of enjoyment for matter attachment ceases. With the cessation of attachment being ceases. With the cessation of being, birth, decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress.cease. Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.

14. There is no rejoicing, no declaration, and no attachment for feelings. When there is no rejoicing, declaration and attachment for feelings, the enjoyment for feelings ceases. With the cessation of enjoyment for feelings attachment ceases. With the cessation of attachment being ceases. With the cessation of being, birth, decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress cease. Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.

15. There is no rejoicing, declaration, or attachment for perceptions. When there is no rejoicing, declaration and attachment for perceptions the enjoyment in perceptions ceases. With the cessation of enjoyment for perceptions attachment ceases. With the cessation of attachment being ceases. With the cessation of being, birth, decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress cease. Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.

16. There is no rejoicing, declaration, or attachment for intentions When there is no rejoicing, declaration and attachment for intentions the enjoyment for intentions ceases. With the cessation of enjoyment for intentions attachment ceases. With the cessation of attachment being ceases. With the cessation of being, birth, decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress cease. Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.

17. There is no rejoicing, declaration, or attachment for consciousness. When there is no rejoicing, declaration and attachment for consciousness, the enjoyment for consciousness ceases. With the cessation of enjoyment for consciousness attachment ceases. With the cessation of attachment being ceases. With the cessation of being, birth, decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress cease. Thus ceases the complete mass of unpleasantness.

18. Monks, this is the cessation of matter, the cessation of feelings, the cessation of perceptions, the cessation of intentions and the cessation of consciousness.

 

21. 1. 1. 7.

(7) Upadaparitasssana - Excited Holding

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta's grove in Sāvatthi. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

2. “Monks, I will teach the excited holding and the not excited giving up. Listen and attend carefully to it.

Those monks said: “Yes, venerable sir.”

3. The Blessed One said: “Monks, what is excited holding?

4. Here, monks the not learned ordinary man, who has not seen noble ones or Great Beings not clever in their Teaching and not trained in it, reflects matter from self, or a material self, or in self matter, or in matter self. When matter changes his consciousness changes accordingly and his mind is overwhelmed with worried thoughts born of the change in matter and he is alarmed, discontented and worried.

5. He reflects feelings from self, or a feeling self, or in self feelings, or in feelings self. When feelings change his consciousness changes accordingly and his mind is overwhelmed with worried thoughts born of the change in feelings and he is alarmed, discontented and worried.

6. He reflects perceptions from self, or a perceiving self, or in self perceptions, or in perceptions self. When perceptions change his consciousness changes accordingly and his mind is overwhelmed with worried thoughts born of the change in perceptions and he is alarmed, discontented and worried.

7. He reflects intentions from self, or an intending self, or in self intentions, or in intentions self. When intentions change his consciousness changes accordingly and his mind is overwhelmed with worried thoughts born of the change in intentions and he is alarmed, discontented and worried.

8. He reflects consciousness from self, or a conscious self, or in self consciousness, or in consciousness self. When consciousness changes a changed consciousness arises to him accordingly and his mind is overwhelmed with worried thoughts born of the change in consciousness and he is alarmed, discontented and worried.

9. Monks, this is excited holding.

10. Monks, what is the non-excited giving up?

11. Here, monks the learned noble disciple who has seen noble ones and Great Beings, clever in their Teaching and trained in it, does not reflect matter from self, or a material self, or in self matter, or in matter self. When matter changes his consciousness does not change accordingly and his mind is not overwhelmed with worried thoughts born of the change in matter and he is not alarmed, discontented and worried.

12. He does not reflect feelings from self, or a feeling self, or in self feelings, or in feelings self. His feelings change, consciousness does not change accordingly and his mind is not overwhelmed with worried thoughts born of the change in feelings and he is not alarmed, discontented and worried.

13. He does not reflect perceptions from self, or a perceiving self, or in self perceptions, or in perceptions self. His perceptions change his consciousness does not change accordingly and his mind is not overwhelmed with worried thoughts born of the change in perceptions and he is not alarmed, discontented and worried.

14. He does not reflect intentions from self, or an intending self, or in self intentions, or in intentions self. His intentions change and his consciousness does not change accordingly and his mind is not overwhelmed with worried thoughts born of the change in intentions and he is not alarmed, discontented and worried.

15. He does not reflect consciousness in self, or a conscious self, or in self consciousness, or in consciousness self. His consciousness changes and consciousness arises accordingly, his mind is not overwhelmed with worried thoughts born of the change in consciousness and he is not alarmed, discontented and worried.

16. Monks, thus is the non-excited giving up.”

 

21. 1. 1. 8.

(8) Upadaparitasssana II - Excited Holding II

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta's grove in Sāvatthi. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

2. “Monks, I will teach the excited holding and the not excited giving up. Listen and attend carefully to it.

Those monks said: “Yes, venerable sir.”

3. The Blessed One said: “Monks, what is excited holding?

4. Here, monks the not learned ordinary man, who has not seen noble ones or Great Beings not clever in their Teaching and not trained in it, reflects matter is mine, I am matter, that is my self. His matter changes and on account of the change arise grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress

5. He reflects feelings are mine, I am feelings, that is my self. His feelings change and on account of the change in his feelings arise grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress.

6. He reflects perceptions are mine, I am perceptions, they are my self. His perceptions change and on account of the change arises grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress.

7. He reflects intentions are mine, I am intntions, they are my self. His intentions change and on account of the change arises grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress.

8. He reflects consciousness is mine, I am consciousness, that is my self. His consciousness changes and on account of the change arise grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress.

9. Monks, this is the excited holding.

10. Monks, what is the non-excited giving up?

11. Here, monks the learned noble disciple reflects matter is not mine, I am not matter, it is not my self. His matter changes and on account of the change grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress do not arise.

12. He reflects feelings are not mine, I am not feelings, they are not my self. His feelings change and on account of the change grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress do not arise

13. He reflects perceptions are not mine, I am not perceptions, They are not my self. His perceptions change and on account of the change in his perceptions grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress do not arise.

14. He reflects intentions are not mine, I am not intentions, they are not my self. His intentions change and on account of the change grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress do not arise

15. He reflects consciousness is not mine, I am not consciousness, it is not my self. His consciousness changes and on account of the change grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress do not arise

16. Monks, this is non-excited giving up.

 

21. 1. 1. 9.

(9) Atiitānāgatapaccuppanna - In The Past, Future and At Present

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta's grove in Sāvatthi. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

2. “Monks matter was impermanent in the past, so too it will be impermanent in the future and there is nothing to doubt about its impermanence at present. Monks, the learned noble disciple who sees it thus, is indifferent to matter in the past, does not rejoice future matter and falls to the method of turning , fading and ceasing present matter.

3. “Monks feelings were impermanent in the past, so too they will be impermanent in the future and there is nothing to doubt about their impermanence at present. Monks, the learned noble disciple who sees it thus, is indifferent to feelings in the past, does not rejoice future feelings and falls to the method of turning, fading and ceasing present feelings.

4. “Monks perceptions were impermanent in the past, so too they will be impermanent in the future and there is nothing to doubt about their impermanence at present. Monks, the learned noble disciple who sees it thus, is indifferent to perceptions in the past, does not rejoice future perceptions and falls to the method of turning, fading and ceasing present perceptions.

5. “Monks intentions were impermanent in the past, so too they will be impermanent in the future and there is nothing to doubt their impermanence at present. Monks, the learned noble disciple who sees it thus, is indifferent to intentions in the past, does not rejoice future intentions and falls to the method of turning away, fading and ceasing present intentions.

6. Monks consciousness was impermanent in the past, so too it will be impermanent in the future and there is nothing to doubt their impermanence at present. Monks, the learned noble disciple who sees it thus, is indifferent to consciousness in the past, does not rejoice future consciousness and falls to the method of turning away, fading and ceasing present consciousness.

 

21. 1. 1. 10.

(10) Atiitānāgatapaccuppanna II - In the Past, Future and At Present II

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta's grove in Sāvatthi. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

2. “Monks matter was unpleasant in the past, so too it will be unpleasant in the future and there is nothing to doubt its unpleasantness at present. Monks, the learned noble disciple who sees it thus, is indifferent to matter in the past, does not rejoice future matter and falls to the method of turning, fading and ceasing present matter.

3. “Monks feelings were unpleasant in the past, so too they will be unpleasant in the future and there is nothing to doubt about their unpleasantness at present. Monks, the learned noble disciple who sees it thus, is indifferent to feelings in the past, does not rejoice future feelings and falls to the method of turning, fading and ceasing present feelings.

4. “Monks perceptions were unpleasant in the past, so too they will be unpleasant in the future and there is nothing to doubt about their unpleasantness at present. Monks, the learned noble disciple who sees it thus, is indifferent to perceptions in the past, does not rejoice future perceptions and falls to the method of turning away, fading and ceasing present perceptions.

5. “Monks intentions were unpleasant in the past, so too they will be unpleasant in the future and there is nothing to doubt their unpleasantness at present. Monks, the learned noble disciple who sees it thus, is indifferent to intentions in the past, does not rejoice future intentions and falls to the method of turning away, fading and ceasing present intentions.

6. Monks consciousness was unpleasant in the past, so too it will be unpleasant in the future and there is nothing to doubt about its unpleasantness at present. Monks, the learned noble disciple who sees it thus, is indifferent to consciousness in the past, does not rejoice future consciousness and falls to the method of turning away, fading and ceasing present consciousness.

 

21. 1. 1. 11.

(11) Atiitānāgatapaccuppanna III - In the Past, Future and At Present III

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta's grove in Sāvatthi. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

2. “Monks matter lacked self in the past, so too it will be lacking self in the future and there is nothing to doubt its lack of a self at present. Monks, the learned noble disciple who sees it thus, is indifferent to matter in the past, does not rejoice future matter and falls to the method of turning, fading and ceasing present matter.

3. “Monks feelings lacked self in the past, so too they will be lacking self in the future and there is nothing to doubt their lack of a self at present. Monks, the learned noble disciple who sees it thus, is indifferent to feelings in the past, does not rejoice future feelings and falls to the method of turning , fading and ceasing present feelings.

4. “Monks perceptions lacked self in the past, so too they will be lacking self in the future and there is nothing to doubt their lack of a self at present. Monks, the learned noble disciple who sees it thus, is indifferent to perceptions in the past, does not rejoice future perceptions and falls to the method of turning away, fading and ceasing present perceptions

5. “Monks intentions lacked self in the past, so too they will be lacking self in the future and there is nothing to doubt their lack of self at present. Monks, the learned noble disciple who sees it thus, is indifferent to intentions in the past, does not rejoice future intentions and falls to the method of turning away, fading and ceasing present intentions.

6. Monks consciousness lacked self in the past, so too it will be lacking self in the future and there is nothing to doubt its lack of self at present. Monks, the learned noble disciple who sees it thus, is indifferent to consciousness in the past, does not rejoice future consciousness and falls to the method of turning away, fading and ceasing present consciousness.

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Notes

1. Reflects matter from self: `rūpaṃ attato samanupassati' Here, matter is whatever matters at one or the other doors of mental contact in the form of seeing, hearing, sensing, tasting, and cognizing.