Sutta Pitaka
Saṃyutta Nikāya
Division II - Nidāna
Book 14 - Anamatagga Saṃyutta
Chapter 1 - Tiṇakaṭṭha (
Paṭhamo) Vagga

Namo tassa bhagavato arahato sammā sambuddhassa

 

14. 1. 1.

(1) Tiṇakaṭṭha - Grass and Sticks

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta's grove in Sāvatthi.

2. The Blessed One addressed the monks from there, saying “Monks,” Those monks replied: “Yes, venerable sir.”

3. And the Blessed One said: “Monks, without an end is the train of existence, a beginning cannot be pointed out of beings enveloped in ignorance and bound by craving, running from one existence to another.

4. “A man who would collect all the grass, sticks and branches in the peninsula of India would make them into four inch pieces to represent his train of mothers, a piece for his mother, another for his mother's mother and so on. Very soon the collection of grass, sticks and branches cut into four inch bits would diminish and finish but not the representation of the mothers.

5. “What is the reason? Monks, without an end is the train of existence, a beginning cannot be pointed out of beings enveloped in ignorance and bound by craving, running from one existence to another.

6. “Thus, monks, you have suffered sharp unpleasantness, severe destruction and filled up cemeteries.

7. “Monks, it is suitable that you should turn away from all determinations, fade and be released from them.”

 

14. 1. 2.

(2) Paṭhavi - Earth

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta's grove in Sāvatthi.

2. The Blessed One addressed the monks from there, saying “Monks” Those monks replied: “Yes, venerable sir.”

3. “And the Blessed One said: “Monks, without an end is the train of existence, a beginning cannot be pointed out of beings enveloped in ignorance and bound by craving, running from one existence to another.

4. “A man who would turn all the earth in the peninsula of India into balls of mud, the size of the kernel of the jujube to represent his train of fathers, one for his father, another for his father's father and so on. Very soon the great earth would diminish and finish but not the representation of the fathers.

5. “What is the reason? Monks, without an end is the train of existence, a beginning cannot be pointed out of beings enveloped in ignorance and bound by craving, running from one existence to another.

6. “Thus monks, you have suffered sharp unpleasantness, severe destruction and filled up cemeteries.

7. “Monks, it is suitable that you should turn away from all determinations, fade and be released from them.”

 

14. 1. 3.

(3) Assu - Tears

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta's grove in Sāvatthi.

2. “Monks, without an end is the train of existence, a beginning cannot be pointed out of beings enveloped in ignorance and bound by craving, running from one existence to another.

3. “Monks, what do you think is more, the collection of tears that you have shed in this long line of existences on account of joints to the disliked and on account of separation from the liked or the water in the four great oceans?”

4. “Venerable sir, as the Blessed One has taught us the collection of tears that we have shed in this long line of existences on account of joints to the disliked and on account of separation from the liked is more than the water in the four great oceans.”

5. “Excellent! Monks, you know the Teaching as taught by me.

6. “Indeed monks, the collection of tears that you have shed in this long line of existences on account of joints to the disliked and on account of separation from the liked is much more than the water in the four great oceans.

7. “Monks, you have long experienced the death of mother ... re ...

8. “Monks, you have long experienced the death of son ... re ...

9. “Monks, you have long experienced the death of daughter ... re ...

10. “Monks, you have long experienced the destruction of relatives ... re ...

11. “Monks, you have long experienced the destruction of wealth ... re ...

12. “Monks, you have long experienced the destruction, through illness and the collection of tears that you have shed in this long line of existences on account of joints to the disliked and on account of separation from the liked is much more than the water in the four great oceans.

13. “What is the reason? Monks, without an end is the train of existence, a beginning cannot be pointed out of beings enveloped in ignorance and bound by craving, running from one existence to another.

14. “Monks, it is suitable that you should turn away from all determinations, fade and be released from them.”

 

14. 1. 4.

(4) Khīraṃ (Mātuthañña) - (Mother's) Milk

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta's grove in Sāvatthi.

2. “Monks, without an end is the train of existence, a beginning cannot be pointed out of beings enveloped in ignorance and bound by craving, running from one existence to another.

3. “Monks, what do you think is more, the milk you have drunk from the mother, while running from one birth to the other in this long line of existences, or the water in the four great oceans?”

4. “Venerable sir, as the Blessed One has taught us, the milk we have drunk from the mother, while running from one birth to the other in this long line of existences, is more than the water in the four great oceans.”

5. “Excellent! monks, you know the Teaching as taught by me.

6. “Indeed monks, the milk you have drunk from the mother, while running from one birth to the other in this long line of existences is much more than the water in the four great oceans.

7. “What is the reason? Monks, without an end is the train of existence, a beginning cannot be pointed out of beings enveloped in ignorance and bound by craving, running from one existence to another.

“Monks, it is suitable that you should turn away from all determinations, fade and be released from them.”

 

14. 1. 5.

(5) Pabbata - A Rock

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta's grove in Sāvatthi.

2. Then a certain monk approached the Blessed One, worshipped and sat on a side.

3. Sitting on a side the monk said to the Blessed One: “Venerable sir, how long is a world cycle?”

4. “Monk, a world cycle is very long and it is not easy to innumerate it as, `it's this amount of years' or `this amount of hundred years,' or `this amount of thousand years,' or `this amount of hundred thousand years'.”

5. “Venerable sir, is it possible to give a comparison?”

6. The Blessed One said: “Possible. Monk, there is a huge rock which is seven miles by the length, breath and the height. It is without a flaw, not perforated and of the same thickness everywhere. After the lapse of one hundred thousand years a man comes with a cashmere cloth and touches the rock once. By this method the rock diminishes and vanishes, but the world cycle does not come to an end.

7. “Monk, so long is the world cycle. Many of these world cycles make a several world cycle and a collection of a hundred of the several world cycles make a several hundred world cycle and a collection of a thousand of the several world cycles make a several thousand world cycle and a collection of a hundred thousand of the several world cycles make a several hundred thousand world cycle.

8. “What is the reason? Monks, without an end is the train of existence, a beginning cannot be pointed out of beings enveloped in ignorance and bound by craving, running from one existence to another.

“Monks, it is suitable that you should turn away from all determinations, fade and be released from them.”

 

14. 1. 6.

(6) Sāsapa - Musard Seeds

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta's grove in Sāvatthi.

2. Then a certain monk approached the Blessed One, worshipped and sat on a side.

3. Sitting on a side the monk said to the Blessed One: “Venerable sir, how long is a world cycle?”

4. “Monk, a world cycle is very long and it is not easy to innumerate it as, `it's this amount of years' or `this amount of hundred years,' or `this amount of thousand years,' or `this amount of hundred thousand years'.”

5. “Venerable sir, is it possible to give a comparison?”

6. The Blessed One said: “Possible. Monk, in a poor city there is a block of mustard seeds seven miles by the length, breath and the height bound together by the roots. After the lapse of one hundred years a man comes and takes out one of the seeds. By this method the mustard seeds diminish and vanish but the world cycle does not come to an end.

7. “Monk, so long is the world cycle. Many of these world cycles make a several world cycle and a collection of a hundred of the several world cycles make a several hundred world cycle and a collection of a thousand of the several world cycles make a several thousand world cycle and a collection of a hundred thousand of the several world cycles make a several hundred thousand world cycle.

8. “What is the reason? Monks, without an end is the train of existence, a beginning cannot be pointed out of beings enveloped in ignorance and bound by craving, running from one existence to another.

“Monks, it is suitable that you should turn away from all determinations, fade and be released from them.”

 

14. 1. 7.

(7) Sāvakā - Disciples

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta's grove in Sāvatthi.

2. Then many monks approached the Blessed One, worshipped and sat on a side.

3. Sitting on a side those monks said to the Blessed One: “Venerable sir, has a large number of world cycles gone by and finished?”

4. “Monks, a large number of world cycles have gone by, it is not easy to innumerate them as `it's this amount of world cycles,' or `this amount of hundred world cycles,' or `this amount of thousand world cycles,' or `this amount of hundred thousand world cycles'.”

5. “Venerable sir, is it possible to give a comparison?”

6. The Blessed One said: “Possible. Monks, there are four disciples who have life spans of hundred years and live the life span of hundred years. They recollect a hundred thousand world cycles per day. Even while they recollect the world cycle remains The four disciples who have life spans of hundred years and has lived the hundred years pass off at the end of the hundred years.

7. “Monks, a large number of world cycles have gone by, it is not easy to innumerate them as `it's this amount of world cycles,' or `this amount of hundred world cycles,' or `this amount of thousand world cycles,' or `this amount of hundred thousand world cycles'.

8. “What is the reason? Monks, without an end is the train of existence, a beginning cannot be pointed out of beings enveloped in ignorance and bound by craving, running from one existence to another.

“Monks, it is suitable that you should turn away from all determinations, fade and be released from them.”

 

14. 1. 8.

(8) Gaṅga - River Ganges

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the squirrels' sanctuary in the bamboo grove in Rajagaha.

2. Then a certain brahmin approached the Blessed One, exchanged friendly greetings and sat on a side.

3. Sitting on a side, the Brahmin said to the Blessed One: “Good Gotama, has a large number of world cycles gone by and finished?”

4. “Brahmin, a large number of world cycles have gone by, it is not easy to innumerate them as, it's this amount of world cycles,' or `this amount of hundred world cycles,' or `this amount of thousand world cycles,' or `this amount of hundred thousand world cycles'.”

5. “Good Gotama, is it possible to give a comparison?”

6. The Blessed One said: “Possible. Brahmin, the river Ganges from its source until it enters the ocean holds sand and pebbles and it is not easy to innumerate the sand as it is `this amount of grains of sand.' Or as `this much hundred grains of sand,' or `this much thousand grains of sand' or `this much hundred thousand grains of sand.'

7. “Indeed brahmin, a large number of world cycles have gone by, it is not easy to innumerate them as, `it's this amount of world cycles,' or `this amount of hundred world cycles,' or `this amount of thousand world cycles,' or `this amount of hundred thousand world cycles.'

8. “What is the reason? Brahmin, without an end is the train of existence, a beginning cannot be pointed out of beings enveloped in ignorance and bound by craving, running from one existence to another.

9. “Thus brahmin, you have suffered sharp unpleasantness, severe destruction and filled up cemeteries. Brahmin, it is suitable that you should turn away from all determinations, fade and be released from them.”

10. Then the Brahmin said to the Blessed One: “Good Gotama, now I understand. Remember me as a lay disciple who has taken refuge from today until I die.

 

14. 1. 9.

(9) Daṇḍo - A Stick

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta's grove in Sāvatthi.

2. “Monks, without an end is the train of existence, a beginning cannot be pointed out of beings enveloped in ignorance and bound by craving, running from one existence to another.

3. “Monks, like a piece of stick thrown up into space would fall back on its fore end, rear end or the middle on its own, in the same manner beings enveloped in ignorance and bound by craving, running from one existence to another, by oneself goes from this world to the next and by oneself comes to this world.

4. “What is the reason? Monks, without an end is the train of existence, a beginning cannot be pointed out, of beings enveloped in ignorance and bound by craving, running from one existence to another.

“Monks, it is suitable that you should turn away from all determinations, fade and be released from them.”

 

14. 1. 10.

(10) Ekapuggala - One Person

1. At one time the Blessed One was living among the Gijjha peaks in Rajagaha.

2. The Blessed One addressed the monks from there, saying “Monks,” Those monks replied, “Yes, venerable sir.”

3. And the Blessed One said: “Monks, without an end is the train of existence, a beginning cannot be pointed out of beings enveloped in ignorance and bound by craving, running from one existence to another.

4. “Monks, the heap of bones, the skeletons of a single person running from one existence to the other throughout a world cycle would be like the Vepulla rock if there was someone to collect them and if the collection was not destroyed.

5. “What is the reason? Monks, without an end is the train of existence, a beginning cannot be pointed out of beings enveloped in ignorance and bound by craving, running from one existence to another.

“Monks, it is suitable that you should turn away from all determinations, fade and be released from them.”

6. The Teacher further said:

“The Great Sages say
The collection of bones of a single person,
Throughout a world cycle, was as big as
The huge Vepulla rock.
Vepulla, is north of the Gijjha peaks,
In the cavity of Magadha
When the four noble truths are seen
With right wisdom as unpleasantness,
The arising of unpleasantness,
The ending of unpleasantness,
And the noble eightfold path for the ending of unpleasantness
He limits his births to seven times the most
And ending all unpleasantness cuts all bonds.